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Posts tagged "Environmental Cleanup"

Hurricanes exposed aging sewer infrastructure, systemic issues

Parts of Georgia received up to 10 inches of rain from Hurricane Irma. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says that Brunswick got 5 inches. The National Weather Service says Glynn County received an average of over 9.4 inches.

Learning about water quality standards can be fun

Protecting Georgia's rivers, lakes and coastal waterways is the responsibility of everyone in the state. That responsibility lies heavily with environmental leaders across the state, but that does not mean that their work cannot include some fun, rest and relaxation. The Institute for Georgia Environmental Leadership seems to have kept this in mind when planning events that included learning about and reviewing water quality standards in the southern part of the state.

Stockpiled tires are a nuisance and a danger

It is against the law in Georgia and most other states to dump tires. Nevertheless, people shamelessly drop their waste tires along the road and even onto private property. Others may allow tires to accumulate on their land or try to burn them. If you have a neighbor who has a stockpile of waste tires, you may be concerned about the environmental impact it is having on your neighborhood.

What is covered under the Georgia Clean Water Act?

The federal Clean Water Act exists to protect water sources in the United States and to preserve the chemical and biological integrity of the sources of that water. The goal of the act is not only to preserve water as an accessible resource that people require but to also preserve the biological diversity of the country's ecosystems as a natural resource in its own right. This preservation helps with the continuation of traditional activities such as hunting and forestry as well as modern cultural, recreational, and commercial use of the resources.

Mine closings present environmental threat as companies go bankrupt

Readers may be aware that the mining industry is currently experiencing significant financial challenges due to lack of demand. As a result, workers are being laid off, companies are filing for bankruptcy, and mines are being abandoned. Along with these mine closings, there is an increased risk to the environment.

Final report from EPA contractor details air, water quality findings after Barwick Mills fire

We have previously written on this blog about the Superfund cleanup process, which is overseen by the Environmental Protection Agency. In previous discussions of the process, we have spoken about the common scenario of industrial plants causing environmental pollution as a result of routine operations, but this is not the only way a site can become contaminated.

Looking at the Superfund cleanup process, P.4

In our last post, we spoke a bit about when a party can be held liable for cleanup of a contaminated site as well as the extent to which a potentially liable party can be held accountable. As we mentioned, though, there are some circumstances that can lead to reduced or no liability for a contaminating party.

Looking at the Superfund cleanup process, P.3

We are continuing to look at the Superfund cleanup process, particular how the Environmental Protection Agency holds parties accountable for their contributions to toxic waste. We’ve already spoken briefly about the three characteristics of Superfund liability. Now, the question is: when is liability triggered and what exactly is a contaminating party responsible for?

Looking at the Superfund cleanup process, P.2

Last time, we looked briefly at the general outline of the Superfund cleanup process, beginning with the discovery of a potentially contaminated site all the way through completion of cleanup efforts and evaluation of the need for long-term protection of a site. One of the points we’d like to touch on briefly is liability. How does the Environmental Protection Agency go about holding contaminating parties liable?

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