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Posts tagged "toxic exposure"

Hurricanes exposed aging sewer infrastructure, systemic issues

Parts of Georgia received up to 10 inches of rain from Hurricane Irma. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says that Brunswick got 5 inches. The National Weather Service says Glynn County received an average of over 9.4 inches.

Oil company reaches massive settlement over environmental contamination

You don’t have to be a health nut to appreciate that we live in a toxic world. Exposure can come from dangerous work environments, medical products, household chemicals, and many other places. The BP oil spill of 2010 is a particularly clear indication of this, though there are many smaller ways we are exposed to dangerous substances

Why hand washing and holiday decorating should go together

If you are like many Georgia residents and holiday lovers in general, you might have lights hung on the house and around a tree or two. While the twinkling lights put a twinkle in your eye and joy in your heart, they might be leaving something a little less happy on your hands.

Study: Buildings in U.S. recklessly house explosive chemicals

In a previous post we discussed the tragedy of a fertilizer plant explosion in Texas. An entire community was not only physically but emotionally rocked by the explosion that was caused when a fire started in a plant and led to the explosion of hazardous chemicals within the building.

Toxic exposure affects people right down to their toenails

Health reports are abuzz with a recent incident of potential toxic exposure in New Jersey. Though the situation isn't taking place in Georgia, the environmental and health matter presents a point that's relevant everywhere: people's health is directly tied to the health of the environment around them.

Oil companies accused of toxic exposure due to diluted product

Oil runs more than just the cars that we drive. It is used to heat buildings, including the buildings that some residents live in or where kids attend school. When the matter is heated what is put in the air might be invisible to the naked eye, but that doesn't mean that it doesn't impact people's health.

Atlanta-based global chemicals company settles claims with the EPA

The Environmental Protection Agency is charged with protecting our natural environment as well as the health of those who enjoy its resources. By enacting legislation that regulates the use of chemicals the EPA is able to protect our natural resources as well as the health and safety of our citizens. And in that spirit, the EPA reported late last month that the agency had settled claims with Kemira Chemicals and Kemira Water Solutions, two subsidiaries of a global chemicals company whose North American headquarters are based in Atlanta.

Doctor takes her toxic exposure fears about fracking to public

"Some fights you must fight, even if you know deep down that you're going to lose," insists a family practice doctor who devotes time to warning communities about the potential health hazards connected to fracturing (also known as fracking). In a recent post about toxic exposure, we shared worries from researchers about how fracking can lead to sick animals.

Fewer toxic chemicals in air and water, more in land

Environmental groups have always focused on encouraging individuals and businesses to be responsible when it comes to creating or disposing of materials that may be toxic. Often, media images focus on things such as pollution smoke coming from a factory, or the contamination of lake, ocean and river water which can endanger both animals and humans. In many ways, the effort to raise awareness has done a lot of good. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that toxic chemicals released into the air have been on the decline since 1998. Between 2010 and 2011 alone there was an 8 percent reduction. Similarly, toxic chemicals in water also decreased by 3 percent during the same period. Improved technology in controlling pollution levels in coal based power plants, and reduced emissions of mercury and other hazardous pollutants is a big reason for the drop.

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