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Posts tagged "Water Contamination"

Georgia county fined for water pollution

Both the federal government and the state of Georgia have taken steps to protect the environment through the passage of several laws. One of those laws has to do with maintaining the cleanliness of the public waters. When a city, county or municipality violates those acts, it could face sanctions for water pollution.

A brief look at the Safe Drinking Water Act, its enforcement, P.1

Previously, we began looking at a national report of drinking water quality which showed that Georgia is one of the worst states in terms of the number of violations of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. As we noted last time, the Safe Drinking Water Act is an important federal law regulating drinking water contaminants.

Report: Georgia drinking water among top five states for Clean Drinking Water Act violations

Clean, safe drinking water is a precious resource, and yet most of us take it for granted most of the time. Typically, it is only when there is news of a water contamination crisis that people begin to realize how lucky they are to have clean water.

Research suggests using easement to protect land from hydraulic fracturing contamination

In our last post, we began looking at a proposed change to state drilling law that would allow landowners’ to better protect their property from the natural gas drilling industry and local governments’ to better protect water supplies from the effects of hydraulic fracturing.

Expecting the unexpected may help you avoid water problems

If you were born and raised in Savannah, Tybee Island or another Georgia region, or for that matter, anywhere in the United States, rancid, contaminated drinking water is not likely high on your list of worries. In fact, that's usually something people in the United States and Canada and other advanced countries tend to imagine when thinking of Third World populations around the globe. However, the crucial factor in something that's unexpected is that you were unable to prepare for it.

Vets to receive supplemental disability benefits for water contamination

Last week, the Veterans’ Administration announced that over $2 billion will be used to provide disability benefits for veterans who were exposed to tainted water during their time at Camp Lejeune, a Marine Corps base in North Carolina. The decision was made after it was determined that there was enough scientific and medical evidence to acknowledge a connection between contamination in the water and eight different medical conditions suffered by the veterans and family members.

Looking at EPA regulation of PFASs and similar chemicals

We’ve been looking in recent posts at a study concerning the presence of toxic chemicals known as PFASs in public water supplies, noting that Georgia is among a group of states noted to have relatively high levels of these chemicals in its water supplies. As we noted, the EPA does regulate this group of chemicals.

Harvard study finds Georgia water supplies may be relatively high in PFASs, P.2

Last time, we began looking at the topic of PFASs contamination of public water supplies. As we noted, there are various potential ways that PFASs can enter into water supplies other than industrial sites. Not surprisingly, these toxins show up more frequently in some states and locations than others.

Harvard study finds Georgia water supplies may be relatively high in PFASs, P.1

In recent posts, we’ve looked a bit at the issue of water fluoridation and some of the legal aspects of the topic. As we noted, water fluoridation allowed on the belief that it is beneficial for public health, and the question of fluoride toxicity is largely dismissed, even if more researchers are questioning the practice.

Water pollution case settlement includes $1 million fund

Environmentalists and governments, including here in Georgia, appear to agree on the importance of enforcing clean water laws, including the federal Clean Water Act. In one locality, Duke Energy has agreed to settle a federal lawsuit by paying $1 million in compensation for water pollution that it caused. The company owned a coal-fired nuclear power plant that discharged toxic heavy metals and pollutants into a nearby lake.

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