Jump to Navigation

Posts tagged "Environmental Law"

Recent federal case in GA clarifies pleading standard in some anti-SLAPP claims

In recent posts, we’ve been looking at the topic of SLAPP litigation, which is often aimed at those who work in environmental advocacy and those who simply take steps to protect their own environmental rights. As we noted last time, Georgia’s anti-SLAPP law applies in both state and federal court.

Environmental groups and the importance of anti-SLAPP litigation, P.2

Last time, we began looking at the topic of anti-SLAPP protections, which are aimed at protecting those who seek to exercise their free speech rights or to protect the public interest from legal claims intended to discourage them from their efforts. As we noted, Georgia has an anti-SLAPP law which requires those filing claims based upon statements made before, or to be reviewed by, a government body to file written verification that the claim is made in good faith.

Environmental groups and the importance of anti-SLAPP litigation

Environmental groups play an important role in the enforcement of environmental law and the protection of the public interest in environmental matters. There are, of course, a large number of these groups, each with its own mission and activities. In carrying out their work, these organizations certainly face their share of challenges.

Pipeline project in SW Georgia raising questions about environmental law compliance, P.2

Previously, we began looking at the problems with erosion that are being raised with the Sabal Trail Pipeline project in southwest Georgia. As we noted, compliance with the standards set forth in the “Green Book,” the Manual for Erosion and Sediment Control in Georgia, is part of the concern.

Pipeline project in SW Georgia raising questions about environmental law compliance, P.1

In our last post, we began looking at the situation of a farmer in southwest Georgia whose property has been destroyed as a result of the Sabal Trail Pipeline project. As we noted, the situation raises questions about whether the pipeline contractors are sincerely working to comply with the requirements of the Clean Water Act and the Manual for Erosion and Sediment Control in Georgia, also known as the Green Book.

Pipeline project may be leaving farmers with significant property costs

Georgia readers, especially in the southwest part of the state, may have heard by now of the Sabal Trail Pipeline, which runs across southwest Georgia down into Florida. The pipeline, which is a joint project of several energy companies, runs across nine counties in the state of Georgia, covering a lot of farmland, with the aim of bringing natural gas supplies to Florida.

A brief look at Georgia water surface rights

Previously, we mentioned the favorable decision recently reached in the water dispute between Georgia and Florida concerning the use of water from the Apalachicola-Cattahoochee-Flint River Basin. As we noted last time, one of the challenges involved in the interstate water wars is that fundamental property rights are at stake.

Georgia wins victory in water wars dispute with state of Florida

We’ve previously written on this blog about the water dispute between Georgia and Florida concerning water use caps. The basic dispute is that neighboring states have long held that Georgia uses an unfair amount of water from the Apalachicola-Cattahoochee-Flint River Basin, which threatens the economies of the other states. Florida had requested limitations on Georgia’s use of water, and that request was appealed all the way to the Supreme Court.

GA lawmakers look to update drilling law to better protect water, landowners

Most of Georgia’s natural gas reserves are in nine counties in Northwest Georgia. Over the past 10 years or so, there have only been several applications for drilling permits. None of those efforts has been successful, but lawmakers are looking to improve state law in order to be prepared for potential changes in the market.

Contact Form

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Visit Our Environmental Law Website Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network