Jump to Navigation

Environmental Law Archives

GA lawmakers look to update drilling law to better protect water, landowners

Most of Georgia’s natural gas reserves are in nine counties in Northwest Georgia. Over the past 10 years or so, there have only been several applications for drilling permits. None of those efforts has been successful, but lawmakers are looking to improve state law in order to be prepared for potential changes in the market.

Georgia Power denies allegations that power plant permits are expired

The Sierra Club and other environmental advocacy groups have reportedly filed a lawsuit against Georgia Power for allowing coal-fired power plants to operate with outdated permits. The groups are alleging that the agency failed to ensure that five different power plants were current on their permit. Some of the facilities, they say, failed to update for permits for more than a decade, and therefore were not in compliance with stricter federal water pollution rules.

Democrats combative over President Trump’s combative EPA nominee

Readers may or may not have heard of President Trump’s nomination of Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency. The pick, like most of Trump’s other nominations, has proven controversial. Lawmakers held a confirmation hearing earlier this month in which they probed Pruitt with hundreds of questions to determine whether he is qualified for the appointment. The most recent report is that Democrats did not turn up for a scheduled vote on the nominee this week.

Plaintiffs draw on environmental law in earthquake litigation

A little known environmental threat has come to the surface in another state, but the ominous message is one that must be kept in mind in Georgia as well. An earthquake that occurred there has been tied by scientists to ongoing corporate waste disposal practices in the area. A class action lawsuit has been filed there on behalf of residents who have been experiencing tremors for years. Recently, the area suffered a 5.8 magnitude earthquake, which has created a unique interchange between environmental law and earthquake occurrences.

What is covered under the Georgia Clean Water Act?

The federal Clean Water Act exists to protect water sources in the United States and to preserve the chemical and biological integrity of the sources of that water. The goal of the act is not only to preserve water as an accessible resource that people require but to also preserve the biological diversity of the country's ecosystems as a natural resource in its own right. This preservation helps with the continuation of traditional activities such as hunting and forestry as well as modern cultural, recreational, and commercial use of the resources.

Florida, Georgia battle it out in court over water-use rights, P.2

In our previous post, we began looking at a water dispute involve the states of Florida and Georgia, which is currently before the U.S. Supreme Court. At issue in the case is the state of Florida’s accusations that Georgia’s water use is having negative effects on water availability downstream.

Mediation can be effective tool in some environmental disputes

Last time, we began speaking about the use of mediation in environmental disputes. As we noted in connection with the currently dispute between Florida and Georgia, going to court isn’t always the best way to resolve environmental disputes, particularly when there are a lot of factors at play and when more flexibility is needed to come up with long-term solutions.

Florida, Georgia battle it out in court over water-use rights, P.1

A legal battle over access to precious water resources is currently underway in a dispute between the states of Florida and Georgia. At issue in the case is the Apalachicola-Cattahoochee-Flint River Basin, a watershed which supplies water to the states of Florida and Georgia, the parties involved in the dispute.

Bee keepers file suit against the EPA

Apples, cucumbers, almonds and pears are just a small representation of food on the list of edibles humans can harvest as a result of pollination. Warnings of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and the drastic decrease in the bee population have concerned farmers who grow crops that require pollination. In order to increase the size of the area bee population, farmers have shipped in healthy bees to replace those lost to disease.

Contact Form

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close
Visit Our Environmental Law Website Subscribe to This Blog's Feed FindLaw Network